Is Embalming Necessary?

For some people, the idea of embalming might be an uncomfortable or scary decision to make following the passing of a loved one. It’s more than a simple yes or no. Whether families are hosting a funeral or a celebration of life, looking to scatter the cremains, or simply wanting to share amongst family, it always makes the decision easier when we understand exactly what embalming is.

 

So What is Embalming?

 

Embalming is described as the process whereby a body is taken through a chemical preservation process that prevents any decomposition of the body.  Though the process might seem eerie and unnatural, it can bring about quite a few benefits.

 

When Does Embalming Happen?

For instance, in some states the process of embalming might be required when transporting a body across state lines following a death.  If a funeral service or viewing ceremony is going to be held anywhere from three to five days following one’s death, embalming is required. This helps keep the body in a condition that prevents malodorous smells and allows family and friends to view a body that most closely reflects their memories of the deceased.  It is also required in order to eliminate safety concerns, like disease or bacteria, or other components such as those that might arise as a result of decomposition.

 

If there is significant time between when a body is embalmed and when a funeral or viewing will be held, there may be an increase in fees as a result of storage needs.

 

When To Say No.

 

 

A viewing might be a crucial religious or spiritual part of the process; it can bring closure and eliminate feelings of denial about a deceased person’s passing.

 

If a funeral and a viewing ceremony simply aren’t a desired part of the mourning process, embalming is not necessary. Depending on social, religious, or cultural backgrounds, the notion of holding a viewing might induce fear or hesitation in some.

 

If a viewing is not wanted, or there is no need to transport the deceased, there might not be the need for embalming. 

 

What To Keep In Mind

 

Families must be made aware that, for cremation, embalming is not a requirement by law. If the intent is for direct cremation, everyone is in their right to reject the embalming of their loved one.

 

Knowing what is wanted and what is ultimately desired out of the final disposition is different for every family. Everyone deserves to know their rights and expectations during a time that is already difficult. Grief can make people susceptible to be taken advantage of so it’s important that people inform themselves on what is truly required by law. Families need to feel comfortable with asking questions, demanding answers, and following the path that is right for them and their loved ones.

 

 


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Blogs

Helping a Child with Pet Loss
Helping a Child with Pet Loss

by Get Urns September 17, 2021 4 min read

Pets are part of the family. They bring unconditional love and joy to our lives, and their loss can be devastating. For parents, explaining the loss of a pet can be difficult. You may not know where to start or how to broach the topic.

To help your child grieve and deal with the loss of a pet, it can be helpful to understand how they understand death.

Read More
Can Cremation Jewelry Help You Overcome Grief?
Can Cremation Jewelry Help You Overcome Grief?

by Get Urns September 10, 2021 4 min read

Losing someone you love or care for is never easy. Grief sets in differently for every person. Some people know that a suffering loved one is no longer in pain, and while they mourn the person, they also know that they're somewhere better.

For other people, and depending on the circumstances, death means continual grief, pain and suffering,

Read More
10 Things to Take to a Grieving Family
10 Things to Take to a Grieving Family

by Get Urns September 03, 2021 4 min read

When friends or loved ones experience a loss, it’s in our nature to do everything we can to help and support them during this difficult time. Often, this means bringing something to the family to make their lives a little easier or to share in the remembrance of the loved one who was lost.
Read More